Evolution: Slavery’s Patron

Evolution: Slavery's Patron

by Warren L Johns, J.D.

  • More than 620,000 Americans lost their lives during the American Civil War’s blood bath, launched by those willing to kill to perpetuate slavery—more than all Americans killed in WW I and WW II combined.

    Charles Darwin didn’t start the Civil War, but his unscientific racist conjectures were embraced by caste system cultures looking to justify cruel exploitation of fellow humans. Evolution’s point man boasted: “The western nations of Europe… immeasurably surpass their former savage progenitors and stand at the summit of civilization…” Descent, Vol. I, 178.

    Wintley Phipps’ unmatched performance of Amazing Grace before a Carnegie Hall audience delivers a stark reminder of slavery’s crime against humanity.

  • Wintley phipps performs "amazing grace"

    Wintley Phipps’ unmatched performance of Amazing Grace before a Carnegie Hall audience delivers a stark reminder of slavery’s crime against humanity.

  • The Grand Army of the Republic

    Insecure minds are the breeding ground for jealousy, pride and hate—the psychological crutch for racism and slavery. Mankind was created equally, in the image of God. Evolution offers an on-ramp for the greed, cruelty and insecurity that sets the stage for slavery. The brutality of human bondage epitomizes the term, “savage,” cited by Darwin from the blind comfort of his elitist perch. His arrogant ignorance has been challenged by the debut of the genome. Homo sapiens of all colors and cultures, have descended from a common ancestor couple, in relatively recent times.

    The point beyond which everyone alive today shares the same set of ancestors is somewhat harder to predict, but it most likely falls between 5,000 and 15,000 years ago, with a significantly more recent date for the point at which we share nearly the same set.” Douglas L. T. Rohde, On the Common Ancestors of All Living Humans, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, November 11, 2003, 27.

    Survivors of Abraham Lincoln’s Grand Army of the Republic held a last national encampment in 1949. Of the thirty living vets, only six attended the convention. Ten of these thirty champions of “equal justice under law,” answered a college kid’s inquiry and shared their Civil War memories. Albert Woolson, one of the ten, welcomed that student to his Duluth, MN home for a personal interview and a photo shoot. Five years later, at the age of 109, Albert Woolson died—the last surviving veteran of the Grand Army of the Republic that broke slavery’s shackles.

    Those gallant guys in blue, put their own lives and their sacred honor on the line for all mankind. Still, the battle for “equal justice, under law” continues.

    Battle Hymn of the Republic by SHeDaisy.

  • soldiers of the Grand army of the republic

    The next three slides showcase the last 30 survivors of the Grand Army of the Republic.

    civil war vets 1
  • soldiers of the Grand army of the republic

    These guys risked their lives for the freedom of many.

    civil war vets 2
  • soldiers of the Grand army of the republic

    Dedicated and honorable.

    civil war vets 3
  • gone, but not forgotton

    Hiram Gale

    One of those last thirty, grand old fighters for equal justice, under law.

  • Meet the last surviving veteran
    of the american civil war

    © Warren L. Johns

    Albert Henry Woolson
    Grand Army of the Republic

  • Albert Woolson's story

    (Continued on next slide)

  • Albert Woolson's story

    (Continued on next slide)

  • Albert Woolson's story

    Would be nice to write out his letter here for easy reading… I can’t make out what he’s saying in many places. lol

  • Wintley Phipps performs "God Bless America"

  • In Appreciation

    SHeDaisy, Utah’s Osborn sisters

    Battle Hymn of the Republic
    The talented Osborn sisters, performing as the SHeDaisy trio, deliver the sound and the message of freedom as background tribute to the GAR.

    Hiram Gale 
    This photo of this distinguished Grand Army of the Republic survivor was presented to the Editor of Genesis File while a college student in 1949.

    Amazing Grace
    Clergyman, Wintley Phipps, unrivaled voice, presents and emotional Amazing Grace to the packed Carnegie Hall with a historic perspective fitting for underscoring the heart-wrenching evil of slavery.